Posted : 12 July 2017

The work of Stewart Carmichael, one of Dundee’s great champions of art, is to be featured in a new exhibition at the University of Dundee, the first major retrospective since his death in 1950.

 

Carmichael, who was born 150 years ago, played a leading role in developing the `Celtic Revival’ art movement in Dundee. The `Stewart Carmichael: Celtic Visions’ exhibition displays his own work and also points to the great influence he had in Dundee’s cultural development.

 

Curator Matthew Jarron said, "Carmichael was arguably the most important champion of art that Dundee had over half a century ago, yet his work has never received the attention it deserves. As well as his significant talents as a painter and illustrator, he was also a tireless campaigner for the role of art in the city.

 

"He created murals for churches and other public buildings, and played an important role in the development of early art collectives such as Dundee Art Society and the first shared artists’ studios in the city. He was also a vocal supporter of art education, including what is now Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design."

 

The exhibition will open in the University’s Lamb Gallery on Saturday, 15th July 2017. It has been created in partnership with The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery & Museum which is also celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. It also features material on loan from other local collections.

 

‘Stewart Carmichael: Celtic Visions’ will run until Saturday, 30th September 2017.

 

For more information contact museum@dundee.ac.uk or 01382 384310.

Posted : 12 July 2016

Urban planning is like "real-life SimCity" to the man who is spearheading Dundee’s waterfront development

Like so many students in Dundee, Mike Galloway immediately left town after earning his degree from Dundee University. His next 18 years as an urban planner included various stints in Glasgow, London and Manchester before eventually returning to Dundee, where he is now working to create a community that will encourage more of today’s graduates to stay put.

Homes for young professionals are currently among the top priorities for Mike, who has been spearheading Dundee’s massive £1 billion waterfront redevelopment since its inception in 1997. With anchor projects such as the V&A design museum and a new railway station now coming out of the ground, he wants to channel further investment into offices, creative space, hotels and housing.

"We need flats for young professionals filling the growing number and variety of jobs available, so they don’t feel they have to leave to pursue their career or have the lifestyle they desire," he says.

"I got all of that out of my system, but I would like to make the decision easier for today’s graduates to either come back or even stay in Dundee."

Raised in Glasgow’s east end, his family later moved to Perth, he says he had no particular ambitions at school, but was eventually drawn to town planning because it’s like "real-life SimCity".

Ironically, he prefers the series to Minecraft, whose local connections include Dundee tech entrepreneur Chris van der Kuyl’s 4J Studios, which worked on console editions of the outrageously popular 3D cuboid game. Last year, 4J Studios also released a Minecraft version of what Dundee’s waterfront will look like when the regeneration project is complete.

"I don’t actually rate Minecraft, but of course the links to Dundee, and what they’ve done with the waterfront project, are fantastic."

www.dundeewaterfront.com

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